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what kind of light is needed to grow weed indoors

What kind of light is needed to grow weed indoors

● Low electricity usage.

Before we reveal the different grow lights for weed, there are quite a few factors to consider. Therefore, we condense them into a handful of handy categories below.

HID Grow Lights – The Traditional, Energy Hungry Choice

This benefit is somewhat counteracted by the fact that the average LED light board is quite low-powered. As a result, you either require multiple boards or a huge, single one. Also, you only get the best results with LEDs that offer a full spectrum of light.

● Lower initial cost than LED.

Factors to Consider Before Buying Grow Lights for Weed

The two types of fluorescent lights are T5 and CFLs. The former is long and narrow, while the latter are twisted into the shape. They have cool, warm, or full-spectrum colors. Growers sometimes use them because they are cheap to buy and have a low energy consumption, saving money on energy bills. They also provide a pleasant color for an indoor growing site.

What kind of light is needed to grow weed indoors

Seed Coupon Included

As you can see, picking the best lights for growing weed is more than simply selecting the priciest model available. Especially if you are growing photoperiod plants, you should think about how many plants you are growing, where you will be growing them, and how much energy you can afford to spend.

The Sun System light emitting ceramic provides all the far frequencies of red light in addition to all the blue light, so your plants will have all the light needed to thrive and produce huge buds. This full spectrum is superior to what is provided by other lights currently on the market. The Sun System is also easy to set up and was designed to reduce the radiant heat generated by its arc tube.

5. Apollo Horticulture MH Light

Can I leave my grow light on 24 hours?

How do you maintain such a powerful light? Small inbuilt fans keep the lights cool and therefore eliminate the need for additional ventilation. Your plants will not suffer from light burn even though they are receiving plenty of light.

Light Spectrum

The downsides of this light are that it is rather noisy and doesn’t include dimming options. However, it still deserves a spot on our top 10 list.

The system is user-friendly and designed to be used straight out of the box. Simply plug it into an available wall socket, and it is good to go. The GRW also comes with a lens to help concentrate the light downwards to maximize the light source and better benefit your plants.

The downside to CFLs is they aren’t great for flowering plants, and growers will usually use another type of light to finish plants. CFLs just don’t generate enough intense light for plants to pack on weight.

The typical homegrower will only need one or two lights. Most states limit grow amounts to 6 or 12 plants, and one or two lights should be plenty for that. If you plan on running two separate rooms, one for vegetative plants and one for flowering plants, you’ll need two lights.

LEDs (light emitting diodes) are relatively new to the cannabis growing world, compared to HPSs, MHs, and CFLs, but they are quickly proving to be the way of the future. LEDs may be more expensive to buy initially, but they are far more efficient and kinder to the environment and your electricity bill. Some cities even give tax breaks to commercial growers who install or switch to LEDs because they’re better for the environment.

Both types of HIDs are usually inexpensive to buy but will eat up electricity. HIDs throw off a lot of light and heat, which the plants need to bulk up and get potent. But, they run hot, contain heavy metals, and ballasts can fail.

Best HID grow light brands

CFLs (compact fluorescent lamps) are fluorescent lights similar to what you’d find in a school or office building, but smaller. For growing weed, they are usually called “T5s”—the “T” stands for “tubular” and the “5” refers to its diameter, “⅝”.

LEDs also typically run a lot cooler than HIDs, so you may not need extra equipment to cool down your grow space, and one LED can usually be used for both vegetative and flowering growth. Some high-end LEDs allow you to change the spectrum for each growth stage.

Ventilation is also a concern. If you’re growing in a tight space with a light that runs hot, you’ll need to have fans in there, which also take up space. If there’s not enough room for a light and a fan, you may need to invest in a light that doesn’t run as hot, such as an LED. For example, grow tents are usually built tall to allow room for equipment up top, not to grow plants all the way to the ceiling.

Other considerations when choosing a cannabis grow light

HID (high-intensity discharge) is an umbrella term under which MH and HPS bulbs fall, which we’ll discuss more below. These types of lamps have a hood that reflects light and bulbs that are enclosed capsules containing a gas, as opposed to bulbs you’d find in your house, which have a filament that heats up.

There are many types of lights, but below are the four most common you’ll find in a grow room. There are many variations within each of these four types as well, and new lights and technology come out all the time.