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what do weed seeds look like

If you wonder what do cannabis seeds look like, you might not be alone. Many people wonder the same. Cannabis seeds may be as big as 2mm or as small as .5mm but cannabis seeds will always be whitish-brown and have small black spots on them. Although some strains may look different, you cannot actually tell the genetics or sex of the plant by just looking at the cannabis seeds, regardless of the claims people make.

What do cannabis seeds look like can’t define any other characteristics of the strain!

If you are wondering whether the size of the cannabis seeds makes a difference, they actually don’t. You will get the same result from big or small cannabis seeds and they will grow to become massive plants even if they came from smaller-than-usual cannabis seeds. Remember that what cannabis seeds look like will not define the plant that you grow or ultimately the cannabis you smoke.

You might find our FAQ submission Where Buy Marijuana Seeds? useful

A seed has germinated once the seed splits and a single sprout appears. The sprout is the taproot, which will become the main stem of the plant, and seeing it is a sign of successful germination.

Marijuana seeds can be acquired from an array of sources and can vary in quality. For more info on how to buy marijuana seeds, check out our Guide to buying cannabis seeds.

Most seeds that you will buy are regular seeds as described above, but here are a couple more types.

Step 2

As we’ve mentioned, cannabis is a dioecious plant, meaning male and female reproductive organs appear on different plants.

Cannabis can be either male or female—also called “dioecious”—but only females produce the buds we all know and love. For reproduction, males have pollen sacs and pollinate females, causing female flowers to produce seeds.

What are high-CBD cannabis seeds?

Some seeds germinate very rapidly while others can take a while, but generally, seeds should germinate in 3-10 days. If it’s been two weeks and a seed hasn’t sprouted, it’s probably a dud and won’t sprout.

In some cases, even if a seed isn’t completely mature, there’s still a chance it could be viable. But often these are extremely weak, take long to develop, and express other unfavorable characteristics. Growers usually discard weak plants to free up space.