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weed and feed on newly seeded lawn

Weed and feed on newly seeded lawn

Before you plant grass seed, you should always prepare the area by removing any weeds that may be growing in the location. Even with careful preparation of the planting site, weeds can still develop among the newly planted grass seed. Weed killers, however, can harm grass seeds and seedlings if applied too early or improperly.

Application Timing

Some pre-emergent herbicides can safely be used during seeding and usually come mixed with a seed starter. These products have the active ingredient Siduron – also known as Tupersan – that works by suppressing weed seeds while improving root development of the new grass. The fertilizer and pre-emergent herbicide mix is applied with a drop or rotary spreader using a rate of 2 1/2 pounds per 1,000 square feet. The spreader setting and actual application depends on the brand of starter fertilizer plus weed control you use, and you should always follow the instructions found on the label.

Herbicides and Seeding

You can control weeds in newly planted grass seed and seedlings without the use of herbicides. Manually pulling the weeds by hand when they first appear keeps them from producing seeds and prevents the problematic plants from spreading, according to the University of California Statewide Integrated Pest Management Program website. They suggest keeping the newly planted grass weed free with proper mowing, irrigation and fertilization. Since newly planted turfgrass has short roots, keep the root zone moist by watering the soil lightly. However, avoid over saturating the soil. After the turfgrass has become established, promote deep and healthy root growth by watering infrequently but deeply.

Weed and feed on newly seeded lawn

What should you do with removed weeds?

Sometimes no matter how hard you have tried, weeds invade that vulnerable space of newly planted grass. Most gardeners deal with weeds at some point, so it is beneficial to know how to deal with weeds. There are a few strategies that can be implemented. The most important of these are:

A safe way to remove weeds is to take hold of them at the base and then pull up slowly. Avoid tugging too harshly because you don’t want to remove only part of the weed while leaving the roots firmly in the ground. If the roots or even just parts of the roots remain, the weed will continue growing. So instead, you want to remove the entire weed.

2. Individually remove weeds

If you are keen to use mulch, we recommend that you use paper pellets instead. Not only do they protect the new seeds, but they help hold water, and they block weeds from rooting.

However, if you are dealing with a considerable weed infestation that can’t be removed by hand, it is best to wait until your grass is more mature before applying weed killer. Your newly seeded lawn should have been mowed at least twice before you should use any weed killer.

It might be tempting to apply weed killer the moment you see that first weed pop out. However, if you use weed killer on newly seeded lawn that isn’t mature enough, the grass and weeds may die. It is a much better approach to remove the weeds one by one if there are only a few weeks.

What Should You Do if You Already Have Weeds?

If you have, then this article is for you. Having the perfect lawn doesn’t have to be something that only belongs to your neighbors. By following our tips, the grass can be greener on your side, too.

People used to use hay mulch years ago, but it has a very high contamination rate when it comes to weed seeds, so you should never use hay mulch.

Weed and feed on newly seeded lawn

Applying starter fertilizer to new grass risks burning your young seedlings, which is why it’s typically best to add those nutrients to the soil at the time of sowing your seed. This way the nutrients are accessible to your new shoots of grass, but have soaked in with your regular watering as you wait for your seed to germinate.

There are two main types of fertilizer to start with: regular (or slow-release) fertilizer and starter (or quick release) fertilizer. Consider the dietary needs of humans in different age groups: the needs of a baby are far different from an adult.

Thanks for the comment and I’m so glad your new lawn is coming in well. If you’re having good results based on their advice I’d probably recommend you stick with it. 6 Weeks after you applied starter fertilizer sounds right to me.

There are three main nutrients in lawn fertilizer. Every fertilizer has a different ratio of these nutrients, and these ratios are on fertilizer packaging as a set of three numbers separated by dashes.

Growing, Growing, Gone

A final application of fertilizer in the fall before the first frost can also provide a beneficial boost for your grass through the winter and lead to more growth come spring. I like to use a phosphorus-heavy fertilizer in the fall to encourage deep root growth. This way my lawn is ready for an organic nitrogen treatment in the spring to green up beautifully.

That being said, too much can lead to burning and using the wrong fertilizer can have far-reaching effects on the soil in your area.

Most grasses require only a small amount of maintenance to grow quite robust.

How to Choose the Best Fertilizer for New Grass

Fertilizing with nitrogen before snow can create snow mold and kill your lawn which landscaper Roger Cooke discusses in the video below:

Hi Sarah;
I also missed the fertilizer at the time of new seed, and now grass is about 1″ tall, should I apply “Scotts starter fertilizer (since its first time I am planning to grow grass) or just the one you suggested with high nitrogen ?