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states that allow you to grow your own weed

Cole Peacock owns Seed and Bean Coffee Shop in downtown Fort Myers and while he supports recreational use believes it may still be too early for Florida to approve it.

In 2016, 70 percent of voters approved a constitutional use of medical marijuana. Polls now show more than half of voters support recreational use, however, it would take 60 percent of voters to get the measure passed.

First, though, activists need to get 225,000 signatures just to get the courts to review it to decide if it can even be placed on the ballot.

Eli Joyce with the grassroots group Regulate Florida is pushing to get recreational use on the 2022 ballot.

The proposed constitutional amendment said those 21 and older could grow nine plants indoors or 18 per household, and they could not sell it. Dr. Heather Auld prescribes cannabis and said buying from dispensaries can be quite expensive.

As you probably know, there has been a growing trend to legalizing cannabis in recent years. Ever since California became the first state to legalize marijuana for medical use in 1996, other states have been lining up to follow in that progressive state’s footsteps.

Many of these states also allow commercial cultivation of cannabis. Commercial growers are highly regulated and subject to state taxes. Each has its own set of laws and regulations.

Where It’s Legal to Grow Cannabis

Many states have made cannabis legal for medical use. Starting with the states of Washington and Colorado in 2012, others have followed to legalize it for recreation as well as health.

Medical Use Only States

In all, 12 states and Washington, D.C., have fully legalized marijuana for medical and recreational use. These include Alaska, California and Colorado as well as Oregon, Vermont and Washington. Illinois recently joined this growing group, which also includes Michigan, Nevada and the New England states of Maine and Massachusetts.