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soil ratio for growing weed

Soil ratio for growing weed

When you think of soil, a pre-mixed plastic bag often comes to mind. Admittedly, it’s pretty easy to just dish out $20-$30 for a bag to start your cannabis grow. Many of these pre-mixed super soils are, in fact, organic and are a terrific starting point for novice gardeners.

What is an organic super soil?

Phosphorus-rich nutrients

Step 2: Find the right soil amendments

Growing cannabis organically allows growers to produce a high-quality product without the interference of chemical nutrients that can burn or kill the plants. It’s important to truly understand what you want in your soil so you can produce your own custom blend that costs less and contains all essential nutrients.

Soil ratio for growing weed

Loam soil is a combination of sand, silt, and clay, typically in a 40/40/20 ratio. It has at least 20% organic compounds and can vary from being easy to work with to incredibly complex. To identify a loam soil, squeeze it. It should form a loose ball that quickly threatens to break apart.

Whether you want to call it dirt or a growth medium, soil is a crucial component for growing marijuana. Choosing the best soil for your weed is arguably the most critical decision you’ll make when growing cannabis at home. Getting it right is likely the difference between a bountiful harvest and utter failure.

What Does Loam Soil Look Like?

This soil type consists of minerals such as quartz and fine organic particles. Although they hold moisture, silt soils have decent drainage and are one of the easiest to work with when wet. Also, silt soils are among the most fertile, which gives you a chance of a decent-sized harvest. With frequent irrigation, you can extend the length of the growing season. Silt soil is one of the best soil types for seedlings.

Overall, you can’t go wrong with an organic super soil and fertilizer mix. The super soil offers the ideal blend of nitrogen, phosphorus, carbon, and a myriad of other nutrients. You can make them yourself, but once again, we recommend investing in store-bought pot soil.

Pros & Cons of Growing Cannabis in Soil

Irrigation in soil is easier than with hydroponic systems, as is fertilization. With so much information gathered from thousands of years of growing, you can quickly become a soil expert as long as you read the right articles!

Soil ratio for growing weed

Bad Cannabis Soil
This soil is muddy, clumpy and waterlogged. It retains too much moisture, which makes it really easy to overwater your plants.

Some growers choose an amended and composted “hot” soil that slowly releases nutrients over time. With this type of soil, you typically just add water or natural supplements like worm tea from seed to harvest. Other growers prefer a lighter potting mix so they have more control, and give nutrients in the water once the plant roots have used up the nutrients in the soil. But which brands can you trust?

When it comes to growing cannabis in soil, unless you’re using a brand that is known for making soil that is specifically cannabis-friendly, there are a few things that you need to consider before starting a grow.

More About Common Amendments to Alter Texture, Drainage & Water Retention of Soil

Good Cannabis Soil
The plant is growing in organic, composted “super soil” which has enough amendments to last your entire grow, so the only thing you do is add water!

Recommended soil nutrients:

Important Cannabis Soil Considerations


(picture by Wattze)

When cannabis growers talk about “super” soil, they’re usually referring to soil that has been amended with slow-releasing organic nutrient sources, and then composted for several months (learn more about super soil).