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no nutrient weed grow

Answer: Possible? Yes.

With marijuana plants, you get what you put into it. If you don’t put a lot of effort into your grow, most of the time your plant won’t reward you with a lot of yield.

Question: Is it possible to grow marijuana without nutrients? Or to grow without proper soil, for example using dirt you dig up outside?

The best thing you can do at this stage is to arm yourself with lots of knowledge. As you learn more about what works and doesn’t work, you’ll learn about all the ways you can save money while growing and still get outstanding yields.

Soil testing can be a simple do-it-yourself procedure or can be done by a reputable lab. It’s a routine procedure and is relatively inexpensive either way. A soil testing DIY kit costs only a few dollars and involves sending a smart amount of soil or growing media to a private or university-owned lab. Within a few days to a week, you will receive a detailed report with your soil’s current nutrient levels, along with the percentage of organic matter, and other relevant information. Doing this test can help you make the necessary adjustments to ensure your cannabis as what it needs to thrive.

What follows is not an exhaustive list, but a sampling of some of the roles of micronutrients and how they aid in the development of cannabis plants:

Essential Secondary Nutrients
Some sources do not separate the secondary nutrients and instead lump them in with the macronutrients since they aren’t needed in the same high quantities as the macronutrients.

What does this have to do with the essential nutrients needed for growing cannabis? Nutrients may well be present in sufficient amounts to support robust growth and plant function, but they can be locked out or otherwise made unavailable to the plant. The ideal pH range to try to maintain for cannabis is generally accepted to be in the 6.0 to 6.5 range, with some variation depending on media selected. To determine pH, make sure to perform a soil analysis.

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Source: Maximum Yield, September 23, 2019

The other macronutrients that are needed and can be added to soils or other media are nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K). Most commercial formulations of dry or liquid fertilizers will have three numbers on their packaging. These three numbers refer to the percentage by volume of N, P and K. Each of these individual essential nutrients performs a different –but vital– function to cannabis plants.

Other trace minerals thought to be essential include cobalt (Co), silicon (Si), chlorine (Cl), and selenium (Se). Not all sources agree on their inclusion in the essential group, though they are important to support all plant life.

No matter what source, boron (B), manganese (Mn), zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), and molybdenum (Mo) are always listed as essential micronutrients. Like the other essential nutrients, all micronutrients either have a unique function or serve to assist in the functions and processes of the other nutrients.

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