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mint julep seeds

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Mint julep seeds

Michael Pollan – Mint julep

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An irregular shape mutation developed by Brad Gates.

Small fruits of 50 to 90 gr, original and variable form, oval pear/heart shaped.

Herbs in containers can be fed lightly with a general purpose fertilizer at half the rate suggested on the package directions.

‘Julep’ is named after the famous beverage that is made with Kentucky bourbon. The leaves have a sweeter flavor than other varieties and is one of the best for adding flavor to teas, fruit drinks, cocktails and desserts. The plant is quite vigorous and it is best to plant it in pots to restrict its growth.

Prepare the garden by breaking up the existing soil (use a hoe, spade, or power tiller) to a depth of 12-16” (30-40cm). Add organic matter such as manure, peat moss or garden compost until the soil is loose and easy to work. Organic ingredients improve drainage, add nutrients, and encourage earthworms and other organisms that help keep soil healthy.

Harvest herbs in the morning, when the plant oils are at their peak. Prepare herb cuttings for use by gently washing and drying the foliage. If planning to preserve the herbs, check foliage for insects or eggs as well. Herbs can be dried or frozen for future use. The general rule for use in cooking is: use twice as much fresh or frozen herb as compared to dried herb.

Watering Instructions

Harvest seeds when the flowers start to fade and turn brown, but before the seeds fall from the plant.

Dig the hole up to two times larger than the root ball and deep enough that the plant will be at the same level in the ground as the soil level in the container. Grasping the plant at the top of the root ball, use your finger to lightly rake apart the lower roots apart. This is especially important if the roots are dense and have filled up the container. Set the plant in the hole.

Do not prune plants after September 1st. Pruning stimulates tender new growth that will damage easily when the first frosts arrive. Once plants have died to the ground they are easy to clean up by simply cutting back to about 4” (10cm) above the ground.

Plant Feed

Check the plant label for suggested spacing and the mature height of the plant. Position plants so that taller plants are in the center or background of the landscape design and shorter plants in the foreground. To remove the plant from the container, gently brace the base of the plant, tip it sideways and tap the outside of the pot to loosen. Rotate the container and continue to tap, loosening the soil until the plant pulls smoothly from the pot.

Unless you are growing an herb specifically for its flowers (such as lavender), or seed production (such as fennel), it is best to remove flower buds as they appear. This keeps the plant’s energy focused on foliage production instead of blooms and seeds.