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marijuana without seeds

Marijuana without seeds

A Spanish term meaning “seedless,” sinsemilla refers to cannabis grown without seeds. In the wild, cannabis grows seeds along with buds so when it dies, it will grow again the following year. Growing sinsemilla cannabis was adopted in the 1960s and ‘70s to produce buds without seeds for consumers, by only growing bud-producing female cannabis plants and not allowing them to get pollinated.

History of sinsemilla

Growing cannabis with seeds is beneficial for the natural evolution of the plant. Plants naturally evolved within their environment, picking up traits and characteristics that helped them better survive their environment.

Benefits of sinsemilla

Cannabis can be male or female, and in the wild males pollinate females, which then produce seeds. The genetics of both male and female plants are passed down to the seeds, so that when a female plant dies—cannabis is an annual, growing and dying each year—it drops seeds, which grow into new plants the following spring.

Marijuana without seeds

Female cannabis plants begin to flower when the days get shorter in the late summer. The amount of time it takes from the first sign of showing flowers to when they are fully ripe and ready to harvest in the fall is commonly referred to as its flowering period. Wild-grown, fertilized cannabis plants produce seeds during this time, and eventually drop them and die as temperatures cool in the fall. However, unfertilized cannabis lives longer and continues to produce flowers for up to a month longer than if it were fertilized. Vegetative growth of the stem and leaves would have ceased at the beginning of the flowering cycle, so all further growth happens in the buds, which become larger and more developed.

The development of the sinsemilla growing technique sparked an increase in potency of market cannabis for two reasons. Not only does seedless cannabis contain more THC, but its advent and spread also were the first time selective breeding was used to choose specimens for their increased potency.

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Edible, nutrient-dense cannabis seeds are sought by small, foraging animals.

Mehmedic, Z.; Chandra, S.; Slade, D.; Denham, H.; Foster, S.; Patel, A. S.; Ross, S. A.; Khan, I. A.; ElSohly, M. A. (2010). Potency Trends of Δ 9 -THC and Other Cannabinoids in Confiscated Cannabis Preparations from 1993 to 2008. Journal of Forensic Sciences, 55 (5) , 1209-1217.

The biology of sinsemilla: why is it more potent?

The increased cannabinoid production in sinsemilla is very clear when looking at available data that tracks cannabis potency from the last 20-30 years. According to an Archival Report from the Society of Biological Psychiatry, the main factor driving the increase in potency of cannabis in the United States is the increase in the proportion of high potency seedless relative to seeded cannabis.

Marijuana has been grown for at least 12,000 years. It was legal for most of its history before its prohibition in the Western world during the 20th century.

It is now so easy to grow high-quality marijuana that users are becoming picky. High THC strains are common, so it is now a question of finding weed with the right aroma and taste. It is marijuana’s aromatic terpene compounds that are mainly responsible for their flavors and scents.

What Is Sinsemilla?

In the great “Is cannabis stronger today than before?” debate, we revealed that the answer is both yes and no. Yes, today, there are strains with THC contents up to 30% that weren’t available ‘back in the day.’ However, it was more a case of strong weed not being available, rather than such marijuana didn’t exist.

Sinsemilla in the Modern Era

Even so, the old-school Mexican brick, filled with seeds, has been replaced by the high-quality marijuana we call ‘sinsemilla.’