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let the weeds and wheat grow together

[the] wheat
σῖτον (siton)
Noun – Accusative Masculine Singular
Strong’s 4621: Wheat, grain. Also plural irregular neuter sita of uncertain derivation; grain, especially wheat.

1 Samuel 25:29 Yet a man is risen to pursue thee, and to seek thy soul: but the soul of my lord shall be bound in the bundle of life with the LORD thy God; and the souls of thine enemies, them shall he sling out, as out of the middle of a sling.

1 Timothy 5:24 Some men’s sins are open beforehand, going before to judgment; and some men they follow after.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
Let both grow together until the harvest. At harvest time I&#8217ll tell the reapers: Gather the weeds first and tie them in bundles to burn them, but store the wheat in my barn.&#8217&#8221

International Standard Version
Let both grow together until the harvest, and at harvest time I will tell the reapers, “Gather the weeds first and tie them in bundles for burning, but bring the wheat into my barn.”‘”

2 Samuel 23:7
The man who touches them must be armed with iron or with the shaft of a spear. The fire burns them to ashes in the place where they lie.”

them
αὐτὰ (auta)
Personal / Possessive Pronoun – Accusative Neuter 3rd Person Plural
Strong’s 846: He, she, it, they, them, same. From the particle au; the reflexive pronoun self, used of the third person, and of the other persons.

harvesters,
θερισταῖς (theristais)
Noun – Dative Masculine Plural
Strong’s 2327: A reaper, harvester. From therizo; a harvester.

Literal Standard Version
permit both to grow together until the harvest, and in the time of the harvest I will say to the reapers, Gather up first the darnel, and bind it in bundles, to burn it, and the wheat gather up into my storehouse.”

Let the weeds and wheat grow together

To really grasp this parable, it’s helpful to understand that Jesus is describing the kingdom of God. Jesus is sowing gospel seeds throughout the world and raising up Christians. But at the same time, the enemy is in the world spreading counterfeit seed. In its immature state, it isn’t always simple to discern the differences between those that belong to the kingdom and those who do not.

The servants should assist Jesus in planting seeds and ensuring that they grow to maturity. At the end of the age, it’s the job of the harvester to judge who is or isn’t a member of God’s kingdom.

First century Jews lived in an agrarian culture, so it’s no wonder that a lot of Jesus’s teaching used the example of crops and farmers. In the Parable of the Sower, Jesus talks about how people respond to the gospel. In the Parable of the Tenants, He used the story of a vineyard to address the ways Israel had consistently worked against God.

"No," he answered, "because while you are pulling the weeds, you may uproot the wheat with them. Let both grow together until the harvest. At that time I will tell the harvesters: First collect the weeds and tie them in bundles to be burned; then gather the wheat and bring it into my barn" (Matthew 13:24-30).

Horticultural sabotage

In Matthew 13, Jesus tells another farm-related story:

The concerned servants want to remove the darnel, but the farmer is afraid they’ll mistakenly throw out perfectly good wheat. He instructs them to leave the separation to the harvesters whose job it is to remove the darnel.

He answered, "The one who sowed the good seed is the Son of Man. The field is the world, and the good seed stands for the people of the kingdom. The weeds are the people of the evil one, and the enemy who sows them is the devil. The harvest is the end of the age, and the harvesters are angels.

Interpreting the parable

The servants asked him, "Do you want us to go and pull them up?"

The owner’s servants came to him and said, "Sir, didn’t you sow good seed in your field? Where then did the weeds come from?"