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Over 50% of medical marijuana users were shown to experience clusters of withdrawal symptoms when they were between uses in a new, detailed study Stopping CBD – Can You Quit Cold Turkey? CBD is great for many people for several reasons. After having an excellent experience with CBD, various situations may occur that might have you

Using CBD oil for pain management? Watch out for withdrawal

Over 50% of medical marijuana users were shown to experience clusters of withdrawal symptoms when they were between uses in a new, detailed study

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Washington [US], January 9 (ANI): More than half of people who use medical marijuana products to ease pain also experience clusters of multiple withdrawal symptoms when they’re between uses, a new study finds.

About 10% of the patients taking part in the study experienced worsening changes to their sleep, mood, mental state, energy, and appetite over the next two years as they continued to use cannabis.

Many of them may not recognize that these symptoms come not from their underlying condition, but from their brain and body’s reaction to the absence of substances in the cannabis products they’re smoking, vaping, eating, or applying to their skin, says the University of Michigan Addiction Center psychologist who led the study.

When someone experiences more than a few such symptoms, it’s called cannabis withdrawal syndrome, and it can mean a higher risk of developing even more serious issues such as a cannabis use disorder.

In the new research published in the journal Addiction, a team from the U-M Medical School and the VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System reports findings from detailed surveys across two years of 527 Michigan residents. All were participating in the state’s system to certify people with certain conditions for use of medical cannabis and had non-cancer-related pain.

“Some people report experiencing significant benefits from medical cannabis, but our findings suggest a real need to increase awareness about the signs of withdrawal symptoms developing to decrease the potential downsides of cannabis use, especially among those who experience severe or worsening symptoms over time,” says Lara Coughlin, Ph.D., the addiction psychologist who led the analysis.

A long-term study in medical cannabis use

The researchers asked the patients whether they had experienced any of 15 different symptoms – ranging from trouble sleeping and nausea to irritability and aggression – when they had gone a significant time without using cannabis.

The researchers used an analytic method to empirically group the patients into those who had no symptoms or mild symptoms at the start of the study, those who had moderate symptoms (meaning they experienced multiple withdrawal symptoms), and those who had severe withdrawal issues that included most or all of the symptoms.

They then looked at how things changed over time, surveying the patients one year and two years after their first survey.

At baseline, 41% of the study participants fell into the mild symptoms group, 34% were in the moderate group and 25% were classed as severe.

Misconceptions about medical cannabis

Many people who turn to medical cannabis for pain do so because other pain relievers haven’t worked, says Coughlin, an assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry who sees patients as part of U-M Addiction Treatment Services. They may also want to avoid long-term use of opioid pain medications because they pose a risk of misuse and other adverse health consequences.

She notes that people who experience issues related to their cannabis use for pain should talk with their health care providers about receiving other pain treatments including psychosocial treatments such as cognitive-behavioral therapy.

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The perception of cannabis as “harmless” is not correct, she says. It contains substances called cannabinoids that act on the brain – and that over time can lead the brain to react when those substances are absent.

In addition to a general craving to use cannabis, withdrawal symptoms can include anxiety, sleep difficulties, decreased appetite, restlessness, depressed mood, aggression, irritability, nausea, sweating, headache, stomach pain, strange dreams, increased anger, and shakiness.

Previous research has shown that the more symptoms and greater severity of symptoms a person has, the less likely they are to be able to reduce their use of cannabis, quit using it, or stay away from it once they quit.

They may mistakenly think that the symptoms happen because of their underlying medical conditions, and may even increase the amount or frequency of their cannabis use to try to counteract the effect – leading to a cycle of increasing use and increasing withdrawal.

Coughlin says people who decide to use a cannabis product for a medical purpose should discuss the amount, route of administration, frequency, and type of cannabis product with their regular health provider. They should also familiarize themselves with the symptoms of cannabis withdrawal and tell their provider if they’re experiencing them.

Feeling the urge to use cannabis after a period without use, such as soon after waking up, can be a sign of withdrawal syndrome, she notes. So can the inability to cut back on use without experiencing craving or other symptoms of withdrawal.

Because there is no medically accepted standard for medical cannabis dosing for different conditions, patients are often faced with a wide array of cannabis products that vary in strength and route of administration. Some products could pose more risk for the development of withdrawal symptoms than others, Coughlin says.

For example, people who smoked cannabis tended to have more severe withdrawal symptoms than others, while people who vaped cannabis reported symptoms that tended to stay the same or get worse but generally did not improve, over time.

As more states legalize cannabis for medical or general use, including several states that will legalize its use based on the results of last November’s election, use is expected to grow.

More about the study

The researchers asked the patients about how they used cannabis products, how often, and how long they’d been using them, as well as about their mental and physical health, their education, and employment status.

Over time, those who had started off in the mild withdrawal symptom group were likely to stay there, but some did progress to moderate withdrawal symptoms.

People in the moderate withdrawal group were more likely to go down in symptoms than up, and by the end of the study, the number of people in the severe category had dropped to 17 percent. In all, 13 percent of the patients had gone up to the next level of symptoms by the end of the first year, and 8 percent had transitioned upward by the end of two years.

Sleep problems were the most common symptom across all three groups, and many in the mild group also reported cravings for cannabis. In the moderate group, the most common withdrawal symptoms were sleep problems, depressed mood, decreased appetite, craving, restlessness, anxiety, and irritability.

The severe withdrawal symptom group was much more likely to report all the symptoms except sweatiness. Nearly all the participants in this group reported irritability, anxiety, and sleep problems. They were also more likely to be longtime and frequent users of cannabis.

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Those in the severe group were more likely to be younger and to have worse mental health. Older adults were less likely to go up in withdrawal symptom severity, while those who vaped cannabis were less likely to transition to a lower withdrawal-severity group.

The study didn’t assess nicotine use or try to distinguish between symptoms that could also be related to breakthrough pain or diagnosed/undiagnosed mental health conditions during abstinence.

Future directions

Coughlin and her colleagues hope future research can explore cannabis withdrawal symptoms among medical cannabis patients further, including the impact of different attempts to abstain, different types of use and administration routes, and interaction with other physical and mental health factors. Most research on cannabis withdrawal has been in recreational users, or “snapshot” looks at medical cannabis patients at a single point in time.

Further research could help identify those most at risk of developing problems, and reduce the risk of progression to cannabis use disorder, which is when someone uses cannabis repeatedly despite major impacts on their lives and ability to function. (ANI)

Stopping CBD – Can You Quit Cold Turkey?

CBD is great for many people for several reasons. After having an excellent experience with CBD, various situations may occur that might have you considering taking a break from your daily CBD routine. And you want to find the best way to have the smoothest experience with stopping CBD.

Stopping CBD cold turkey won’t have withdrawal symptoms. CBD is reported safe & non-addictive to avid users. After a few days of stopping, old symptoms may begin cropping up again. Before stopping CBD, talk to your doctor to verify it’s safe without impacting any other medications you’re taking.

Below, we’ll look at stories of those who’ve quit CBD cold turkey, as well as highlight research surrounding quitting CBD.

Can You Quit CBD Cold Turkey?

Below, we highlight John’s “poor” experience in quitting CBD cold turkey.

While you can quit CBD cold turkey without it causing any significant extra trouble, John doesn’t recommend stopping CBD all at once.

If you’re taking CBD with other medications, quitting CBD cold turkey can impact how your other medications interact with your body and may cause issues.

Before you quit CBD cold turkey, it’s best to have a quick chat with your primary healthcare provider.

Do You Need To Wean Off CBD Oil?

As a general rule, you don’t need to wean off of CBD, however, if you want a more comfortable experience in stopping CBD — it’s best to slowly taper off.

Slowly weaning yourself off of CBD can make returning to normal aches and pains a bit less shocking on the system.

Instead of having your issues come back all at once, it can be a more gentle experience if you slowly decrease your CBD intake until you can completely stop.

Users quitting CBD generally report the process of stopping CBD to be mild and subtle that doesn’t last for long periods of time.

Does CBD Have Withdrawal Symptoms?

In total, CBD doesn’t have any specific withdrawal symptoms (in itself), according to those who were able to completely stop CBD.

After taking CBD for several months, your body starts entering into a more optimal state of balance and homeostasis regulation throughout nearly every cell and system within your body.

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When you’re body is in an optimal state of homeostasis from CBD providing nutrients to the Endocannabinoid System (ECS), your body and mind are experiencing this state as normal and adapt to it.

Stopping CBD, when your body expects it as part of its normal routine, may cause you to experience a resurgence of symptoms from issues CBD was aiding.

You won’t experience any new withdrawal symptoms from stopping CBD, however, you may find your old symptoms popping back up into your new normal daily routine that doesn’t involve CBD.

Side Effects Of Abruptly Stopping CBD Oil

A personal story of John Kaste quitting CBD — cold turkey — for ten days in extensive detail.

In short, John measured four areas including pain, sleep quality, injury recovery, and overall mood.

  • Daily aches and pains more through his normal range of motion.
  • Stiffness
  • Less flexibility
  • Loss of sleep quality
  • Slower to recover from physical activities
  • More stress
  • More emotional
  • More annoyed, angry, and frustrated

Other users who’ve stopped taking CBD reported feeling a bit more anxious and weren’t sleeping as well as they were when taking CBD regularly.

Any benefit you received from taking CBD will cease and old symptoms can crop up as your body finished removing the remaining CBD from its system.

How Long Does It Take To Detox From CBD?

According to Healthline, CBD can remain in your body for as little as two days and up to five days — more or less.

Each user will process CBD differently and some can have CBD remain in their system for several weeks.

What determines how long CBD stays in your systems involves.

  • Dosage – How much
  • How often you take CBD throughout the day
  • Method of consumption
  • Your body chemistry
  • Your diet can affect how quickly CBD is metabolized by your body

With numerous types of CBD products on the market with a wide range of strengths, it can be hard to pinpoint how long specifically a CBD detox will take.

Is CBD Addictive?

According to Dr. Jeffrey Chen, MD, CBD is not addictive, with the World Health Organization (WHO) confirming CBD doesn’t have abuse or dependence potential.

Published in the Journal of Cannabis & Cannabinoid Research, reports CBD is non-hedonic, meaning CBD doesn’t give you pleasure.

Further evidence shows CBD can actually reduce drug-seeking behavior.

The journal of Substance Abuse: Research & Treatment shows how CBD can modulate certain circuits in the brain involving drug addiction.

Comprehensive results from 100+ studies verify the safety profile and tolerability of large chronic doses of CBD in humans.

Is CBD Addictive For Dogs?

CBD is not addictive for dogs and is safe for your dog to take every day, as needed.

If your dog is taking any other medications, it’s best to talk with a qualified veterinarian to verify taking CBD is the best course of action.

Dr. Casara Andre, the founder of Veterinary Cannabis Education & Consulting, tells The Washington Post that there’s no risk of addiction with taking CBD.

Should I Stop Taking CBD Before Surgery?

According to Kirby Plastic Surgery, you should stop taking CBD two weeks before your surgery.

CBD can have the potential to interfere with anesthesia, reacting with certain liver enzymes.

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