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how to grow marijuana legally in washington state

How to grow marijuana legally in washington state

Timothy Nadreau, a research economist at Washington State University, said he studied how allowing marijuana home growing would affect state revenue. He concluded that cannabis tax collections would most likely continue to increase if HB 1019 passed, in part because home growing could boost people’s interest in cannabis products.

That concern was echoed by substance-abuse prevention advocates, particularly because the bill says the state Liquor and Cannabis Board wouldn’t have authority to enforce the rules that would apply to home marijuana grows.

Right now, the state is collecting about $1 billion per year in marijuana excise tax revenues.

Local authorities will also be notified of where you plan to open up shop and have an opportunity to object. Also, you’ll need to make sure the location can meet the following specifications:

What’s the cost of the Washington marijuana producer license?

Counties and municipalities can also prohibit marijuana producers or processors in areas zoned for residential or rural use. Moses Lake, for example, limits producers and processors to specific industrial areas. Some Washington cities don’t allow marijuana businesses at all, including Leavenworth, Poulsbo, Pomeroy, Othello, and Richland.

Step 5: Hit All the Requirements

In order to get or maintain a marijuana producer license, the rules require that your grow shop has planned protocol for each of the following:

How to grow marijuana legally in washington state

That includes sharing cannabis with anyone underage, like your friends or family. Which also means it’s illegal for even parents to give cannabis to their teens.

Every employer and landlord is different. But each of them has the right to restrict cannabis use—even if you’re of legal age. So, before you use, ask your employer or landlord their rules around cannabis.

1 oz. of useable cannabis

On campus

Want to know if you can buy cannabis? You need to be 21 or older—and have a valid photo ID to prove it. With that, you can buy cannabis from any store licensed by the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board.

That’s your teas and juices.

Coming

Think candy, brownies, crackers, mints, and more.

16 oz. of cannabis-infused, solid edibles