Posted on

how to grow a weed plant in water

Different growing mediums require different flushing timeframes before harvest:

Additionally, roots pull in oxygen as soil dries and when soil is too wet, the plant can’t pull in oxygen efficiently and essentially can’t breathe.

You want to water a plant enough to soak all the soil in the pot. Water should pool up on the surface of the soil when you’re watering, and come out the drainage holes in the bottom of the pot after a couple seconds. If water sits on the surface of the soil, that means it’s too wet and doesn’t need more water.

If growing in amended organic soil, it is not recommended to flush plants. This is because the soil already holds all the nutrients the plant needs to thrive, and by flooding the soil you can wash away and damage the complex ecosystem that you’ve worked hard to develop.

Flushing marijuana plants before harvest

If a weed plant is very dry, water will run straight through the soil and pot and quickly come out the drainage holes. If this happens, water the plant a little bit and then come back to it after 15-20 minutes and water it again, and maybe even a third time. This allows the soil to slowly absorb water until all of it is thoroughly wet.

A flush can also be done to clear plants of nutrients if they have a nutrient imbalance, such as nutrient lockout, when your plants are overloaded with nutrients and unable to absorb new ones.

When you find the sweet spot between too wet and too dry, your plants will flourish.

How to tell if a cannabis plant needs watering

Ideally, cannabis plants should start in a small pot and progress to bigger and bigger pots as they outgrow each container. For example, you can start a seedling or clone in a 4″ or 1-gallon pot, then move on to a 2-gallon, 5-gallon, 10-gallon, and so on.

Plants are ready to transplant when a healthy root structure encompasses most of the soil and the roots aren’t bound. When transplanting, take time to look at the quality of the roots: Bright white roots with a strong, thick structure is a sign plants are getting watered correctly.

This article has been viewed 1,200,220 times.

This article was co-authored by Lauren Kurtz. Lauren Kurtz is a Naturalist and Horticultural Specialist. Lauren has worked for Aurora, Colorado managing the Water-Wise Garden at Aurora Municipal Center for the Water Conservation Department. She earned a BA in Environmental and Sustainability Studies from Western Michigan University in 2014.

wikiHow marks an article as reader-approved once it receives enough positive feedback. In this case, 97% of readers who voted found the article helpful, earning it our reader-approved status.

There are 14 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page.

Whether you call it weed, cannabis, pot, marijuana, or something else, the plant known as Cannabis sativa is actually easy to grow at home when you know what you need to do. Growing hydroponically will provide you with higher yields and a shorter grow time compared to growing in soil, but it can often be difficult for the beginning grower to get started with hydroponics. However, most people think of plants growing in water when they think “hydroponics” but actually your plants will get many of the benefits of hydroponics as long as they’re getting their nutrients directly in their water supply. However because of superior air to water ratio in hydroponics, it remains the industry standard. This tutorial will show you step-by-step how to grow your marijuana in 3-4 months using the (arguably) easiest hydroponic method: hand-watering in a soil-less medium.