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how to grow a marijuana plant with one seed

How to grow a marijuana plant with one seed

It’s important to make sure your cannabis is ready before snipping down branches and hanging them to cure. A magnifying tool is a useful item for recognizing when your trichomes are in full force. You can choose a jeweler’s loupe, a handheld magnifier, or a digital microscope. The latter is extremely expensive, however!

Some experts believe you should allow the buds to cure for up to eight weeks.

Overall, germination can take 24-72 hours, depending on the method used. If you decide to purchase seeds, make sure they are feminized. Otherwise, there is a 50/50 chance that the plant you grow is male. When the seed has germinated, it is time to transplant it. This means planting it in soil.

Harvesting

When your cannabis is cured, you should divide it into several portions. It is also a good idea to weigh each package! It is best to keep the wrapped marijuana in a sealed mason jar to keep it fresher for longer. You should also store it in a dark place at a temperature of no more than 70 degrees.

However, some experts believe you should allow the buds to cure for up to eight weeks. Others suggest that you get the best cannabis when it is cured for six months! Once the humidity level goes below 65%, you only need to open the jar once a day, or even once every few days.

Curing

Please make sure you live in a place where it is legal to cultivate cannabis before you begin. Also, check out these easy to grow marijuana strains. We recommend choosing one of them before beginning your adventure.

After 3-8 weeks, depending on the strain and your preference, your plant will enter the flowering stage. You need to force it into blooming by ensuring it gets 12 hours of consecutive darkness each day. Sativas tend to take longer to bloom. Some can remain in flowering for up to 14 weeks! However, 8-9 weeks is more typical.

How to grow a marijuana plant with one seed

The last step involves curing the bud. “Curing is just as important as the growing process,” Lipton added. “We do a slow cure, which means that it takes anywhere from three to six weeks depending on variety.” Temperature and humidity play a large role during cure and must be maintained to ensure a great final product. “Our actual cure process is somewhat of a secret, so I cannot share the fine details,” Lipton said. “But it’s an art form and extremely crucial to our success.” The reason growers cure bud after harvesting is that it creates a smoother smoke and increases its potency. Detailed recommendations for proper curing can be found online, here and here.

pH of Water: 6.3 to 6.7. “You’ll need a meter that you can stick into your water and tell you the pH,” Lipton said. “You want something between 6.3 to 6.7 pH for watering your plants. That sounds like pretty sophisticated stuff but it’s really not. A lot of times your tap water will be 7.8. You can use what they call pH down. That’s a crucial step.”

Before someone even begins to consider the genetics of their preferred strain, they should first ensure that their apartment is cannabis-friendly. There are five main factors to consider: space, temperature, humidity, the pH of water, and the amount of light.

Even in our most progressive states, however, the law is far from simple. “In Colorado, it’s now county-specific,” Lipton said. “When the amendment first passed, they said you could grow six plants per person. But now, certain counties and municipalities have come out and said it’s just six per house — there’s no combining plant counts. That means you can have three vegetating and three flowering at any given time.”

Harvest and cure.

While most, if not all, medical and recreational farms cultivate cannabis from seeds, guaranteeing that their plants are free from viruses, most home growers, even those with experience, typically begin with clones — essentially trimmed pieces of female cannabis plants that have been rooted in separate pots. “When most people think of cannabis — you know, what you smoke — they’re thinking about the flowers of female plants,” Lipton said. “When you grow from seeds, half of them will be males. If you’re only going to do one or two plants, you don’t want to waste your time with that stuff.” A clone sourced from a dispensary or a knowledgeable friend guarantees that the plant is female and will eventually produce bud pending proper care. “You can get up to four ounces off the right plant — if you know what you’re doing.”

Even with a healthy clone, however, cultivating cannabis can be a long and arduous process — especially in tight indoor spaces. “A lot of people think growing is easy, but it’s not,” Lipton said. “You have to be really on it. Not everyone has success, obviously.”

Sticking to that schedule is key, he added. “Say you’re at day 30 of the flowering cycle and you come into that closet when it’s supposed to be dark and turn a bunch of lights on. You’re going to throw the whole cycle off and that’s the end of that. It only takes 10 seconds.”

Find a healthy clone.

Space: 3 x 3 x 5 feet, minimum. “The bigger the space, the better. With all the lights, closets get hot,” Lipton said. That said, closets help growers control light pollution when the plant is in its flowering cycle — one of the main reasons home growers favor them over larger spaces, such as living rooms. “If you have a spare bedroom, or a basement even, you can just use that and close the door,” Lipton said.

Despite the hurdles, many first-time growers still choose to cultivate cannabis indoors (which is legal in Alaska, Colorado, Washington D.C. and Oregon), and there are steps to maximize a plant’s chances of succeeding. It all starts with a plant’s genetics. “For your typical closet setup, you’re going to want a plant that stays short,” Lipton said. “A lot of time that means an indica. Sativas are really tall and lanky.” (More on the difference between those two families here.)