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growing weed without lights

Growing weed without lights

Because of their overhead installation, skylights are a great way to supplement or provide indoor lighting that’s good for weed plants. Of course, the number of skylights and their size will both be factors in the overall benefits these lights.

While growing high-quality marijuana without lights indoors presents its share of unique challenges, it provides a realistic alternative to investing in expensive grow lights and paying lofty electric bills. If you want to try your hand at growing indoors with natural light, weigh your options and consider the locations and practices described here. Most likely your home and its design will present a way to harness solar energy from Mother Nature to fuel your grow.

Heat and humidity management will also be a major concern for window sill growers. Some window sills have heaters and radiators under them adding extra heat to the budding marijuana plant. Growers can select containers with water reservoirs to ensure the plant is well hydrated.

These artificial light sources allow cannabis growers to easily cultivate high-quality cannabis indoors. But can cannabis be grown indoors without artificial light? Absolutely! But the indoor grower faces some challenges to harness the free solar energy emitted from the sun.

Bay Windows and Window Sills For Growing Weed

Because of the four solid walls in courtyards, you want to avoid the shade factor as much as possible. Cannabis enjoys direct sunlight, so situating the plants near the center of the courtyard will provide the best orientation for receiving maximum sun exposure.

Natural sunlight beats out artificial lights in terms of cost. Free sunlight is hard to beat, especially compared to costly artificial light systems. In some environments, however, sunlight is hard to come by and varies by region.

This is a reality of growing cannabis. Both light and darkness at critical stages of its life cycle are necessary for it to thrive. While plants can grow with continuous light during the vegetative stage, a significant period of darkness will cause it to create buds and reach sexual maturity during the flowering stage.

Attics and Skylights For Growing Pot

When considering growing marijuana in a solarium, energy conservation is a major element to consider. Some growers opt for black marble to absorb the sun’s light and heat during the colder months.

Floor heating systems can also be used in solariums and greenhouses under wood flooring, concrete, or metal panels. Floor heating enables cannabis plants to grow during all seasons. Radiant heating provides uniform heating compared to other heating systems.

What many growers don’t realize is that cannabis demands an uninterrupted dark cycle. Just as your good REM sleep would be interrupted if a light popped on at 2 a.m., cannabis doesn’t fare well when any light disturbs it during its dark “sleep” cycle. The moon and stars don’t bother cannabis, but any artificial light can stop its bud growth. In fact, light interrupting its dark cycles can make cannabis so stressed and irritable that it can lead to hermaphroditism. That can pollinate females and ruin your plants.

As a cultivated plant, cannabis still responds to light changes. Depending upon the strain you’re working with as well as your environmental demands, your light-to-dark ratio will vary a bit. If you’re new to the strain (or growing), talk to old hands about when to end the vegetative phase and trigger your plants’ flowering phase. That timing is critical to maximizing your yield. Here are some more specifics.

Cannabis in the vegetative stage (when it is growing at a rapid pace) needs at least 13 hours of light per day. In fact, indoor growers commonly use an 18/6 light to dark ratio to encourage faster growth. (Note that most indoor growers vegetate their plants 4 – 8 weeks.)

Keep to Your Chosen Schedule

When you are ready for your cannabis plants to flower, a 12-hours of light and 12-hours of darkness schedule is standard. Nighttime provides darkness, keeping cannabis on somewhat of a natural clock. This is why indoor growers need to make a deliberate effort to not only create long, bright days but also emulate dark cycles for cannabis to grow large full buds.

If you decide on the classic 12/12 light dep schedule where you cover your plants at 7 p.m. and uncover them at 7 a.m., be consistent with that schedule. Keep in mind that this schedule requires adequate ventilation, so some growers will choose to uncover their plants at night once the sky is completely dark.

Covering and uncovering your greenhouse on a set schedule, day in and day out can be extremely time and labor intensive. Pulling tarps is a lot of work, but using the right tools and products makes all the difference. To improve your harvest, you need to provide ample, reliable darkness for your cannabis, a good light deprivation cover and a tarp puller system will help you maintain your light deprivation schedule.

How Much Darkness is Needed?

Americover’s BOLD® Black Out Light Deprivation Tarp is the top-selling greenhouse cover of its kind nationwide, consisting of two sheets of high strength virgin polyethylene film laminated together with a third layer of molten polyethylene. The cover is scrim reinforced for superior tear resistance. Plus, the cover can be easily set or lifted with the BOLD EZarm Tarp Puller. The BOLD EZarm allows one person to easily cover and uncover a greenhouse without additional help, making the daily chore of light deprivation so much easier.

Cannabis is a photoperiodic plant that responds to seasonal changes in light. That means when the days grow shorter, the plant’s life cycle is nearing its end, and flowering occurs for reproduction. In nature, male cannabis sacs release pollen to pollinate female plants in blossom. The result is seeds, which allow the plant to produce the next generation.