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growing weed in an apartment building

Growing weed in an apartment building

Pros

Apartments vary in layout, square footage, and height. Choosing the right grow space for your cannabis requires considering various factors. Here are the most common places to grow weed in an apartment and their pros and cons.

Where to Grow Weed in an Apartment

In your rental agreement, there may be a provision that prohibits modifications to the rental property, including changing light fixtures or installing exhaust systems through the wall.

Pros

Low Odor Strains

The consequences of violating a rental agreement may vary by the property manager and state and local law. While you may not get evicted immediately, you may face court appearances or eviction if you continue to engage in this illegal activity.

Smoke-free clauses can be included at the start of a new tenancy agreement or added to an existing tenancy agreement if the landlord and tenant agree in writing to an amendment. If a tenancy agreement made prior to June 1, 2018 (the day of assent for f Bill 6) prohibits the smoking of tobacco products but is silent on the smoking of cannabis, it will be considered to also prohibit the smoking of cannabis. As a result of an amendment added to the Residential Tenancies Act by Bill 6, a landlord now has the authority to notify a tenant in writing that cultivation is prohibited in a rental premises even if the existing lease does not deal with this.

Can tenants smoke cannabis for medical purposes on a property?

If a building is smoke-free, does this apply to balconies, common areas, or anywhere elsewhere on the property?

Under the Federal Cannabis Act adults will be able to grow up to four plants at their place of residence for personal use. There cannot be more than four plants, no matter how many adults live in the home. A landlord that wishes to restrict the growing of cannabis in a rental unit can include a clause in the tenancy agreement stipulating this limitation, or notify a tenant in writing. As a result of an amendment added to the Residential Tenancies Act by Bill 6, a landlord now has the authority to notify a tenant in writing that cultivation is prohibited in a rental premises even if the existing lease does not deal with that issue.