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growing different strains of weed

Growing different strains of weed

For a variety of reasons, many cannabis growers cultivate only one type of strain. Maybe you grow just one strain because you like its effect, aroma, and taste. When you grow several plants of the same strain, it means that your plants will require the same nutrients and watering regimen, and it ensures a fairly even canopy so that all your plants receive sufficient light for good yields. You can also expect to harvest your plants at about the same time. In short: If you grow only one type of weed, it can make things easier.

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW WHEN YOU GROW DIFFERENT STRAINS

Growing different cannabis strains in the same room can provide you with nice perks. You can enjoy harvesting weed with different flavours and effects. It can also mean higher yields. But it can also pose some challenges. Here are the pros and cons of growing different strains in the same room.

GROWING DIFFERENT STRAINS IN THE SAME ROOM

Here are the disadvantages that you could face when growing different strains in your grow room.

Growing different strains of weed

A relative newcomer to the strain world, Wedding Cake is a Cookies cross that launched a whole new family of cake strains, such as Ice Cream Cake, LA Kush Cake, Cake Batter, and so much more.

This is a strong, sturdy plant that doesn’t need much attention, but be sure to give it plenty of space to stretch out—it grows tall, like parent Lemon Skunk. Scrogging always helps, but you’ll likely get solid yields even without it. SLH usually takes a little longer to flower, around nine weeks, another sign of its sativa roots, so you may need to be a little patient when waiting to harvest this one.

Wedding Cake

This strain can handle many climates, both indoors and outdoors, but it can take a long time to flower—more like nine or ten weeks. Regardless, GMO Cookies is a new standard that packs a punch and brings some great savory scents to your garden.

So here are five strains that are easy to grow for beginners: they grow strong, yield high, can grow in many different climates, and have a forgiving margin of error.

GMO Cookies

And to make things even easier, you may want to check out feminized or autoflower versions of them—feminized seeds don’t need to be sexed out to identify and get rid of pesky male plants; with autoflowers, you don’t have to worry about light changing, and you can harvest plants 2-3 months after seeds sprout.

Growing different strains of weed

Back to the Super Lemon Haze example: This strain takes a lot of its bud structure, trichome and resin production, and overall appearance from Super Silver Haze. But it takes its flavors and aromas from Lemon Skunk.

A single male plant can pollinate tens of females. “It’s always a good idea to have only one male, genetically speaking, per pollination effort,” says Pennington. “A healthy male can pollinate up to 20 females, and by pollinate, I mean absolutely cover the plant with seeds.”

Cannabis breeders typically breed to purify and strengthen strains, combine strain traits, or enhance specific characteristics.

When the seeds are mature, they are harvested and stratified (or dried). “The secondary process of maturation happens after the plant is dead, and the seed needs to be stratified before it will germinate,” says Pennington. “In general, harvest for flower takes place three to four weeks before harvest for seed.”

Phenotypes

After two parent strains are selected for breeding, a male and several females are put into a breeding chamber to contain the pollen. A breeding chamber can be as simple as an enclosed environment with plastic sheeting on the sides, or a specially designed sterile environment for large-scale breeding.

Backcrossing is a practice where a breeder will cross-pollinate the new strain with itself or a parent—essentially, inbreeding the strain. This makes the strain more homozygous, and strengthens its genetics and desirable characteristics, and also ensures that those genes continue to pass down from generation to generation.

While browsing Leafly’s strain database, you may wonder what a cross of this and that strain is, what a hybrid or a backcross is, or what a parent strain is. All of these have to do with plant breeding—essentially, breeding a male and female plant to combine or refine the genetics of two plants or strains. Breeding two different strains often results in a new strain, or hybrid.

The Basics of Breeding

Cannabis plants can be either male or female. Cannabis consumers are mainly concerned with female plants, because only females produce the sticky buds that we all know and love. But male cannabis plants are important for the breeding process, as they are needed to pollinate the bud-producing females.

But the process doesn’t end there. The hybrid strain that you buy at the dispensary has likely gone through many rounds—or generations—of breeding to strengthen its genes and to ensure that its descendants are healthy and consistent.