Posted on

growing cannabis outdoors in california

Growing cannabis outdoors in california

You can also check if your plants need more water by weighing the pot since the water in the soil is not always noticeable from the top. Have a pot filled with dry soil (and no plant) next to your plant, and compare their weights. If they are similar, it’s time to water. If not, don’t water yet.

Seed Coupon Included

California doesn’t have the same four extremely distinct seasons that other geographic areas might have, but the seasons are worth thinking about all the same. Of course, it makes a big difference if you’re living in Southern California or Northern California. NorCal’s weather is a bit gloomy, with rain and cooler temperatures. SoCal is a sunny and warm desert, which means dry air and toasty temperatures. In the South, winters can be warm and sunny, much like summer, but with heat that isn’t as oppressive. However, there is less daylight in the wintertime, making summer a better season for growing .

How much water?

Avoid Common Mistakes

Growing your plants outdoors means that they will have no shortage of access to direct sunlight. Marijuana plants require a balance between maximum sunlight and indirect sunlight(shade) for maximum productivity.

For plants that are affected by the sun for their life stage changes, you can manipulate their size a bit more. It all depends on how much growing time and sunlight they get. So your pots could vary in size from 5 gallons to 35 gallons for 1 ounce to 10 pounds of weed.

Plant size

While California isn’t known for its torrential rainstorms, on the occasion that it does rain, it’s a good idea to bring in your plants if possible (such as if they are planted in a pot). If they are planted in the ground, you can use a plant umbrella or else a black trash bag to protect them. While it might seem like rain would be a good thing for plants, in fact, it can make your plants get far too damp, and take a long time to dry. That would then encourage mildew or mold to develop. Check out our kits if you’re ready to get started.

Knowing how to grow a small weed plant is likely the hardest part of actually growing it. Now that you know what to do, you are well on your way to enjoying hassle-free, home-grown marijuana.

Typically, outdoor growers will add amendments to soil when weed plants are transplanted outside. Outdoor amendments usually come in powder form that you mix in with soil.

Once you have an understanding of the climate in your area, you’ll need to consider a few things before planting your weed.

While shopping for soil, you might be overwhelmed by the options available at your local garden store. The soil type is the basic structure of your soil. From there, look at nutrients, microorganisms, and other amendments that improve the soil. Your choices will be flooded with words like:

Big yields

Growing containers

There are also commercially available soil blends that already contain the proper mix of these types of ingredients.

Sandy soil is easy to work, drains well, and warms quickly, but it doesn’t hold nutrients well, especially in rainy environments. You’ll want to dig large holes for your plants and add compost, peat moss, or coco coir, which will help bind the soil together.

Heavy clay soils drain slowly and don’t hold oxygen well, so they will need to be heavily amended. A few weeks before you plant, dig large holes where you’ll be placing your weed plants and mix in big amounts of compost, manure, worm castings, or other decomposed organic matter. This will provide aeration and drainage, as well as nutrients for the plants.

Sunlight

Your cannabis plants should receive as much direct sunlight as possible, ideally during midday, when the quality of light is best. As the season changes and fall approaches, your plants will get less and less sunlight throughout the day, which will trigger the flowering stage.

You can make this yourself by combining worm castings, bat guano, and other components with a good soil and letting it sit for a few weeks, or it can be purchased pre-made from a local nursery or grow shop.

Boys and girls
Cannabis is also “dioecious”, which means male and female flowers are borne on separate plants. This may seem weird, but it is quite common in the plant world. Pistachios, date palms, stinging nettles and Gingko trees all have male and female flowers on separate plants. Just as only female pistachio trees produce nuts, only female cannabis plants produce the useful flower clusters commonly called “buds”. Male flowers are tiny and fall off once they’ve bloomed and shed their pollen.

The proper dryness is when the buds are dry, but not crispy to the touch. A good rule of thumb is to bend the stems below the flowers. If the stems snap but don’t break clean through, the flowers are probably about the right dryness. If the stems merely bend, let the cannabis dry some more. If the stems snap clean through into separate pieces, the flowers are probably too dry. If needed, they can be placed in a slightly more humid environment briefly to rehydrate so they don’t crumble when handled.

Brown/gray mold, also called “bud mold” or “stem mold” is a systemic fungus that rots buds from the inside out. The best way to prevent it is to keep the plants from getting rained on during flowering phase and to provide extensive dry airflow. Once mold is identified in a bud, remove and discard the infested part and harvest the adjacent bud to limit the spread.