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growing cannabis in coco coir guide

Growing cannabis in coco coir guide

Any quality cannabis nutrients made for hydroponics will work well for growing in coco coir as long as you also use a Cal-Mag supplement.

Honestly though I often use water right out the tap. You’ll be adding Cal-Mag and setting the pH later, but the “best” way is to start supplementing your coco coir now, and it definitely may save you time and trouble later.

However, this tutorial focuses on coco growing that doesn’t involve any soil or non-inert ingredients, in order to achieve the fastest growth. You’ll learn how to grow with a coco/perlite mix and provide nutrients in the water. This root environment creates thriving cannabis plants.

Are you interested in growing cannabis with coco coir? Coco coir is a highly productive growing medium for cannabis that gives the experience of growing in soil, but many of the benefits of growing weed in hydro, including fewer bugs and faster growth.

Don’t worry if the mix feels soaking wet, it will dry in the fabric pots once you have a fan blowing over them in your grow tent.

Recap: Do you have everything you need to make your coco coir mix? You’ll need the following items to complete the tutorial above.

The following tutorial makes about 10 gallons of potting mix. Double the recipe for 20 gallons!

Dig a small hole in your coco coir containers so there’s room for the new seedlings. Take a butter knife and carefully slide it all around the edges of each solo cup, then carefully transplant your seedling into your bigger coco coir containers.

You’ll see the brick almost instantly starts getting soft once it makes contact with the water.

Growing cannabis in coco coir guide

This means that nitrogen draw down is no longer a major problem, sodium contamination from retting in seawater does not occur, the naturally occurring potassium levels are adjusted and treatment with calcium and other ions is carried out before the product is packaged. Suppliers of high grade coco also carry out regular testing of their product to check for any irregularities in supply and to correct for these.

Coco substrates also had a high cation exchange capacity and retained calcium, phosphate and iron meaning these became unavailable for plant uptake until the coco had been in use for some time and had fully `conditioned’. As a result many soilless growers initially experienced problems with coco they didn’t understand. Few growers understood the degree with which the coco media was affecting the composition of the nutrient solution in the root zone and the fact that the coco provided an almost ideal physical structure for plant growth was overlooked.

Coco, a superior growth media

However, high quality horticultural coco is now recognised as a superior growth media for soilless crops on both a small and commercial scale and many of the initial problems have been overcome by correct processing of the raw product and adjustment or pre treatment before packaging. High quality coco substrates on the market for soilless cropping have often been specifically processed for this use right from the point of removal from the coconuts, through to preconditioning, buffering and pre treatment.

Different types of coco products – uses, pros and cons

There are many different types of coco products on the market. The husk of coconuts yields not only very coarse long fibres which are used to make a wide range of products such as rope, carpets, mats, brushes, basket liners and others, but between these coarse fibres is a corky substance called coir pith, coir dust, coco peat or coir peat. Many grades of horticultural coco exist and some have been specifically designed for different plants and systems. The very fine particle size of coir dust retains a high level of moisture and this is suited to seed raising and for smaller seedlings and plants. While a high moisture holding content in fine coco dust is an advantage in some situations, it can create problems with over saturation of the root zone. Grades of coco often used in slabs may consist of larger particles or `flakes’ of coco which allow a good degree of drainage and resist packing down over time as commonly occurs on substrates such as peat.