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growing 20 weed plants

Growing 20 weed plants

So after a few weeks of mourning, I decided to give pot-plant parenting a second try. And this time around, I was determined to spare no expense — potential tax savings be damned. I invested in a bathroom scale so I could weigh the plant between waterings, and when Taylor offhandedly suggested an LED grow light so I could raise my little green girl indoors, I immediately ordered one and cleared a spot in my garage, not far from where my hard-partying friends used to routinely smoke plants like her in the pre-pandemic days.

The fix was easy enough. Brandishing my P-Touch label maker, I printed out “Lowryder strain, seed two” and stuck the label on the container of curing buds, right over top of the one that read “Diana Prince.” I instantly felt better.

Mother-son pot entrepreneurs? Vape pens that match your track pants? We have questions.

For almost as long as I’ve known about the cannabis plant, I’ve wanted to grow my own weed. This is partly because I like everything about it; not just the psychoactive effect of combusting and inhaling it, but also the way it looks, from the slender serrated fan leaves to the densely packed flowers shimmering with a crystal-like dusting (called trichomes, these tiny, hair-like structures are home to the high-producing compound THC). I like the skunky smell of a live plant, and I appreciate the fact that it’s only the female of the genus that will get you high.

Then it hit me: In my haste to marry the nostalgic farm-to-table experiences of my Vermont childhood to my love of weed, I’d forgotten the part about not forming an emotional bond and had done exactly that. Even worse, I’d given her a name and imagined a personality for her. By naming her Diana Prince, I’d become less of an urban herb farmer about to get his buzz on and more like the Titan Kronos of Greek mythology about to swallow his offspring.

You can buy all the parts necessary for a drip system individually and assemble them yourself, but drip irrigation kits offer an easier and more economical option. They give you everything you need and can be assembled in as little as a few hours. By adding an automatic timer, you can even ensure your plants regular watering when you are away.

In addition to high summer temps outside, grow lights themselves can cause excessive heat. If you are battling high heat, look for lights that emit less heat. In addition, you can use fans or portable air conditioners to cool your grow room to the proper temperature.

Watering Cannabis

Pot plants need plenty of sun to grow too. But indoors they will be shielded from Old Sol. To substitute for the sun, a wide choice of grow lights is available on the market, making it easy to meet your growing needs and your budget.

Whether you want to raise cannabis commercially for profit or are looking to grow some bud for recreational fun or medical marijuana for good health, setting up and using a grow room offers lots of advantages. Unlike growing marijuana outdoors, raising it indoors in a grow room allows you to control all the crucial conditions that affect its growth, like temperature, light, nutrients and water. In addition, growing weed indoors will keep it away from destructive four-legged pests like rabbits and deer who may want your crop.

How to Get Sunlight & Fertilizer for Indoor Cannabis Plants

Also consider humidity. Depending on the stage of growth, pot plants generally like relative humidity from 40% to 70%. Conditions that are too humid can lead to disease, molds and fungus. Extremely dry conditions can retard the growth of your pot plants.