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grow one cannabis plant at home

Grow one cannabis plant at home

It’s important to make sure your cannabis is ready before snipping down branches and hanging them to cure. A magnifying tool is a useful item for recognizing when your trichomes are in full force. You can choose a jeweler’s loupe, a handheld magnifier, or a digital microscope. The latter is extremely expensive, however!

Those who have tried it say it is challenging yet rewarding. They also say it gives them a greater appreciation of the cannabis plant. This guide is designed to help you grow a single plant for fun.

When your cannabis is cured, you should divide it into several portions. It is also a good idea to weigh each package! It is best to keep the wrapped marijuana in a sealed mason jar to keep it fresher for longer. You should also store it in a dark place at a temperature of no more than 70 degrees.

Harvesting

Another way to determine if cannabis is harvest-ready is the pistil method. It would help if you harvested when around 70% of the pistils turn brown. Again, wait too long, and your plant will start losing THC. You will benefit from a higher CBD level if you wait until 80-90% of the pistils are brown. However, the risk isn’t worth the reward if it is generally a low-CBD plant.

Overall, germination can take 24-72 hours, depending on the method used. If you decide to purchase seeds, make sure they are feminized. Otherwise, there is a 50/50 chance that the plant you grow is male. When the seed has germinated, it is time to transplant it. This means planting it in soil.

Germinating the Seed

It is important to ensure that the plants have enough oxygen. Their roots also need to have enough room to grow. You have to switch your plant to a larger container as the growth cycle continues.

The trichome method is a popular way to see if a cannabis plant is ready for harvesting.

Grow one cannabis plant at home

Whatever you do, don’t plant your clones in the ground. They’ll run rampant, and “you’ll have pounds of weed in your house,” Johnson says, recalling the trays of weed atop his kitchen table when his crop grew wild. “You don’t need the stress of plants getting out of control, growing over your fence.” If your neighbors can see them, they might complain about them, and having too many plants could get you arrested.

When the pandemic hit, many of us turned to quaint pastimes to soothe our existential dread, whether it was baking sourdough, knitting, or doing jigsaw puzzles. If you want to expand your repertoire of distraction methods with an activity that still has that quiet, homey vibe, but with a bit more of an edge, consider growing your own weed.

There are different harvesting methods, but Johnson cuts the whole plant at the base and hangs it upside down with some twine in a dark room at a temperature of around 70 degrees Fahrenheit. Add a fan for airflow — you definitely don’t want the room to be humid, which will cause mold to grow, rendering your crop unusable. It’ll probably take around a week to dry.

Planting

If you use organic soil, all you’ll really need to do is add water, Johnson says — but don’t overdo it. The number one mistake he sees new growers make is watering their plants too often. In general, “watering every day is too much. The rule is, if you pick up your plant, and the pot is heavy, then it has a enough water. If it’s light, it’s dry, then you need to water.” You could also stick your finger knuckle-deep into the soil; if it feels dry, add water.

Do your homework and read up on the laws in your state. Some states prohibit growing cannabis, while others, like my home state of California, permits anyone over age 21 to grow cannabis, but only up to a certain number of plants. NORML has a pretty in-depth guide to the laws in each state. Colorado, Oregon, Nevada, Vermont, and Maine also allow cultivation, but again, the specifics depend on the state. Definitely clarify what your rights are before you start the glorious path to at-home bud gardening.

Before you get started

Cannabis plants can be either male or female. Female plants yield the plump flowers, a.k.a., “buds,” that we know and love, brimming with psychoactive compounds like tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, which gets you high), Modern Farmer explains. Male plants yield much smaller flowers, which people typically don’t consume. In other words, if you want to actually indulge in your crop, you’ll want female plants.

Since clones come from plants that have been grown indoors, let yours chill in a shaded area for a week before exposing them to full sun, Johnson says. “The clone hasn’t tasted sun like that, and the transplant itself will be stressful.”