Cannabis Plant Seed Pods

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Saving your seeds means saving your money. The skill is simple to learn, but takes practice and knowledge to know what to save, when to save, and how to harvest seeds. Well today I was looking at my plants, and the big one has seeds everywere. It has been flowering for about 2 monts now, under a 400 hps. Well when I… I have an indoor growroom and in my recent harvest I found seeds in the buds, but I’m sure there are no male plants in the room.

The Basics Of Saving Seeds

Saving seeds from plants in your garden is a simple yet important skill to learn. When you save seeds, you save money: Every seed saved is one less seed or plant to purchase in the future.

For vegetable crops, saving seeds from the most productive plants can result in plants that are more adapted to your garden’s growing conditions. Locally-adapted plants produce better yields, so each seed you save is like a promise of future bumper crops.

Practice seed-saving basics with plants that offer easily harvested seeds.

What Seeds To Save

While it makes sense to save seeds from flowers and vegetables you normally grow from seed, make sure you’re saving seeds from open-pollinated varieties. With open-pollinated plants, seeds produce plants resembling parent plants. Many heirloom plants are open pollinated.

Start your seed-saving training with plants that have easy-to-harvest seeds, like lettuce, beans, peas, Morning Glories, Four-O’Clocks, Scarlet Sage or Zinnias.

Other tips to know as you save seed:

  • Seeds from hybrid plants don’t produce plants similar to the parents. Check plant tags and seed packets to know if you’re planting hybrids.
  • Some plants readily cross-pollinate with other plants of the same type. This list includes corn, gourds, pumpkin and melon. To save seeds from these plants, grow only one variety each season.
  • In cold regions, biennial plants need two growing seasons to produce seeds. In warm regions, fall-planted biennials bear seed the following spring. This list includes beets, cabbage and carrots.
  • Saving seeds means that you’ll have less harvest to eat and fewer flowers to pick, because you’ll be letting plants produce seeds instead.

When To Save

Allow seeds to mature on plants before collecting. Clues for maturity include a hard seed coat and darkened color. Check plants daily when you’re waiting for seeds to ripen.

For seeds contained in a pod, like Cardinal Climber or beans, let seedpods dry on plants and harvest individual pods as they dry. If freezing weather or heavy rains arrive as seedpods are ripening, gather pods for drying indoors.

How To Harvest

For many plants, it’s easiest to collect entire seed heads or pods. Examples include Zinnias, Scarlet Sage, lettuce and broccoli. Plants like Four-O’Clocks or onions produce seeds that are easily gathered individually, since they are already separated from surrounding plant parts.

Separate Seeds From Chaff

Retrieve seeds from the flower head, husk or pod. Often you can do this by rolling the seed head between your hands over a piece of paper. For all but the smallest seeds, use a three-speed fan to blow chaff away.

An alternative method is to build a hand screen by attaching metal screen to a wooden frame. The wire gauge of the screen should permit seeds to pass through. To use, break seed heads apart over the screen, and shake the screen over a large piece of paper. Collect seeds.

Dry Seeds

To dry seeds, spread them on newspaper, paper plates or a screen in a cool, dry place. Dry seeds as quickly as possible to preserve best germination rates. Drying time varies depending on humidity, but most seeds dry in 5-7 days.

How do you know if seeds are dry enough?

  • Dry seeds should be brittle and hard.
  • A properly dried seed won’t bend when you try to break it in half – it snaps in two.
  • Dry beans won’t give when you bite them.
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How To Store

Moisture and warmth spur seed germination, so storage conditions should eliminate these factors. Store seeds in paper envelopes, glass jars or plastic bags. Glass is the best choice, since it excludes moisture.

Ideal storage conditions are cool and dry: less than 50ºF with relative humidity less than 50%. Some gardeners add silica gel to seed storage containers to help absorb moisture. If adding silica gel to sealed jars, remove the gel after one week.

For every 10 degrees that storage temperature decreases, seed longevity doubles. Store valuable seeds in glass canning jars in the freezer. Bring jars to room temperature before opening to prevent condensation from forming on seeds.

Seed pods everywere

Well today I was looking at my plants, and the big one has seeds everywere. It has been flowering for about 2 monts now, under a 400 hps. Well when I checked it, they were everywere. Can I just pull them off? Should I just leave it?

It’s my biggest plant, looks very healty, but is right next to my other plant. I don’t wan’t to chop her, but I don’t want this to happen again.

I live in Cal. so I have the clinics. Is it not good to get plants from them?

Thanks for your time.

Norman Mushari
Member
LorDeMO
Active Member
bird mcbride
Well-Known Member

Well today I was looking at my plants, and the big one has seeds everywere. It has been flowering for about 2 monts now, under a 400 hps. Well when I checked it, they were everywere. Can I just pull them off? Should I just leave it?

It’s my biggest plant, looks very healty, but is right next to my other plant. I don’t wan’t to chop her, but I don’t want this to happen again.

I live in Cal. so I have the clinics. Is it not good to get plants from them?

Thanks for your time.

Brick Top
New Member

The thread title said seed pods everywhere. Every female plant has seed pods. A little known cannabis fact is that each individual seed pod is a cannabis flower. Entire buds are not actually flowers, as in individual flowers, but instead clusters of many tiny flowers, the individual seed pods/flowers that grow together and create buds. Each seed pod/flower will ‘plump up’ and appear to have seeds in them when they near maturity. They will give an appearance of having seeds inside, but not have seeds in them.

If your plant’s seed pods/flowers have seeds growing in them there are only several possible causes. Hermies, or a male or males that were not removed prior to releasing pollen or an outside source for pollen that is carried by wind or brought in by someone and then transferred by inside air currents resulting in pollination.

There are no immaculate conceptions in herb growing.

bird mcbride
Well-Known Member

The thread title said seed pods everywhere. Every female plant has seed pods. A little known cannabis fact is that each individual seed pod is a cannabis flower. Entire buds are not actually flowers, as in individual flowers, but instead clusters of many tiny flowers, the individual seed pods/flowers that grow together and create buds. Each seed pod/flower will ‘plump up’ and appear to have seeds in them when they near maturity. They will give an appearance of having seeds inside, but not have seeds in them.

If your plant’s seed pods/flowers have seeds growing in them there are only several possible causes. Hermies, or a male or males that were not removed prior to releasing pollen or an outside source for pollen that is carried by wind or brought in by someone and then transferred by inside air currents resulting in pollination.

There are no immaculate conceptions in herb growing.

Norman Mushari
Member

They are mostly red hairs now.

There are cressent shapes at base of stems, but none of them have seeds at all.

I have been doing some searching on this sight, and It seems some people have seeds in their buds, and some have obvious male characteristics, more near where branc meets. If I no signs of seeds at base, and no bananas, is it not a hermi?

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I checked light and there were no cracks, but I am aving issues with heat. Sometimes I come ome and its like 90+degrees and 30 or less on humid. Is that the issue?

Thanks for the help guys

orellej
Well-Known Member

i have a lr2 that has pods but they don’t hang down, they are pointed up and i just noticed that the lower clumps of pods have white hairs coming out. i clipped an couple pods off and dried them, nothing inside. i was hoping it was a male so i could grow seeds. is this a hermie? it doesn’t look at all like the females i’ve grown. there are trichomes not many compared with past plants. will it produce pollen?? thanks

budd23
Member

I had bananas show up a week or so ago and now budds are filled with pods, which have liquid in them. Am I in trouble?

majek
Well-Known Member

Calyxes are seed pods, if they get pollenated they will grow seeds, if not they swell up with resin. Trichomes are the “crystals” that protect the leaves and calyxes from insects and fungal disease.

If you have fully mature seeds in your buds then you can pull them out or leave them it’s up to you. A few seeds won’t hurt anything as long as you don’t smoke them

budd23
Member

Calyxes are seed pods, if they get pollenated they will grow seeds, if not they swell up with resin. Trichomes are the “crystals” that protect the leaves and calyxes from insects and fungal disease.

If you have fully mature seeds in your buds then you can pull them out or leave them it’s up to you. A few seeds won’t hurt anything as long as you don’t smoke them

So far, they are full of liquid, but there are so many, and look like seed. Budds are full of them. I also had the little bananas show up a couple of weeks ago, then the pods. I actually took down 2 plants today, and budds are full of these pods. I think I’m screwed.

BelieveInJesus
New Member
budd23
Member

Calyxes are seed pods, if they get pollenated they will grow seeds, if not they swell up with resin. Trichomes are the “crystals” that protect the leaves and calyxes from insects and fungal disease.

If you have fully mature seeds in your buds then you can pull them out or leave them it’s up to you. A few seeds won’t hurt anything as long as you don’t smoke them

Below are pics. What do you think?

budd23
Member
budd23
Member

The thread title said seed pods everywhere. Every female plant has seed pods. A little known cannabis fact is that each individual seed pod is a cannabis flower. Entire buds are not actually flowers, as in individual flowers, but instead clusters of many tiny flowers, the individual seed pods/flowers that grow together and create buds. Each seed pod/flower will ‘plump up’ and appear to have seeds in them when they near maturity. They will give an appearance of having seeds inside, but not have seeds in them.

If your plant’s seed pods/flowers have seeds growing in them there are only several possible causes. Hermies, or a male or males that were not removed prior to releasing pollen or an outside source for pollen that is carried by wind or brought in by someone and then transferred by inside air currents resulting in pollination.

There are no immaculate conceptions in herb growing.

Here are pics of mine. Looks like seed pods, but only liquid inside. Any Suggestions or comments? Thanks.

I have an indoor growroom and in my recent harvest I found seeds in the buds, but I’m sure there are no male plants in the room. I’ve heard that light leakage can cause plants to become hermaphrodites. Is this true, and if so, do you have any tips for avoiding this?

Cannabis plants are monecious. This means they have the ability to be either male or female. Or in the case of hermaphroditism, they can be both. The reason to make sure there are no males or hermaphrodites in your garden is because male flowers make pollen. When pollen touches the white hairs on a flower, it makes a seed, and seeded weed gives you headaches. Even though there are reasons in nature hermaphroditism could be important, such as continuing the species in case there is no male present, hermaphroditism is generally a bad thing when talking about cannabis plants.

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Light poisoning is the most common cause for a normal plant to hermaphrodite.

Light poisoning refers to the flowering night cycle of a plant being unnaturally interrupted with light. The best way to prevent this is to close yourself inside your darkened room during the daylight, and then after allowing a few minutes for your eyes to adjust to the dark, check for any light leaks from covered windows, door jams, etc. Also cover all timer and appliance lights with tape.

Negative stressors can combine with small interruptions of the light cycle to cause hermaphroditism, especially with less-stable, clone-only hybridized strains. When the night cycle is abnormally interrupted, it sends a mixed hormonal signal to the plant. This can cause a full female plant to throw some male flowers. Male flowers are easy to identify, especially when side by side with female flowers. Male flowers look like small bunches of bananas, which will take a week or two to swell before they burst and release their pollen.

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Finding a hermaphrodite in your growroom can happen at any stage of the flowering cycle and is indicated by the presence of male flowers growing on the same plant as female flowers. As with all species in nature this can occur in varying degrees. A plant can become slightly or majorly hermaphroditic. In cases where singular male flowers are found between the branch and stalk nodes, you should be diligently removing them as they grow. You must re-inspect the plant top to bottom every few days to be sure pollination and seeding doesn’t occur. If you find male flowers (anthers) actually growing from within the female flowers (buds) the situation is a little more dire. You can still remove all the male anatomy as it appears, but it will be harder to find and much more prevalent. This is a horrible discovery that leads to a tough decision: Should you let the plant live and risk the whole crop being ruined by seeds?

In either case, once hermaphroditism has compromised the safety and purity of your sensimilla, the plant should not be propagated further. Remember, once a hermy, always a hermy. The plant pictured here is in the tenth and what should have been the final week of ripening, but a timer failed and one light stayed on continuously for almost two weeks, causing this vegetative regrowth. Because the light was continuous, the plant made no pollen. This method of re-vegging can be used to save a flowering plant you have no copies of, but be careful, as this may cause some strains to hermaphrodite.

Purposefully causing a plant to hermaphrodite is called selfing. Gibberellic acid or colloidal silver is typically sprayed onto the female plant. This technique is used to make feminized seeds and uses the plant’s ability to be both male and female to force a female plant to produce male flowers. The pollen contained in these male flowers can only produce female seeds. Just keep in mind that feminized plants should not be used for breeding, as they were produced without a true male, making them genetically inferior.

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